Developing nanotechnology-based cancer therapeutics

Most cancer drugs are blunt instruments. We are working at the molecular level to engineer new therapeutic agents that can home in on cancer cells and selectively destroy them.  Designing these nanoscale “smart bombs” requires multiple rapidly advancing technologies and the expertise to combine them.  Critical components of therapeutic nanoparticles include:  (1) a targeting mechanism such as an antibody or aptamer that identifies cancer cells by the molecules they express; (2) a destructive mechanism such as a drug, antibody or RNA interference (RNAi) molecule that disables cancer cells; and (3) molecular packaging such as a liposome or other material that allows the therapeutic agent to traverse the body efficiently.

Featured Faculty: Sangeeta Bhatia

Learn more about the work the Bhatia lab is doing to use micro and nanotechnologies to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

Participating Intramural Faculty

Daniel G. Anderson

Angela Belcher

Sangeeta N. Bhatia

Michael J. Cima

Paula Hammond

Darrell J. Irvine

Robert S. Langer

J. Christopher Love

Phillip A. Sharp

K. Dane Wittrup

To browse recent publications by these and other Koch Institute faculty members, visit Progress, our monthly research review.