Engineering the immune system to fight cancer

Although cancer cells are derived from normal tissues, the changes they undergo should be sufficient for the immune system to recognize and destroy them.  In fact, many nascent cancers may be destroyed by the immune system before they develop. The fact that cancers do develop implies that either the immune system fails to recognize the alterations that give rise to cancer or that cancer cells are actively evading the immune response. We are exploring in depth the relationship between the immune system and cancer in animal models and human tissues to understand and overcome the failed immune response as well as to create therapeutic antibodies through state-of-the art protein engineering methods.

Featured Faculty: Darrell Irvine

Learn more the work going on in the Irvine lab, which focuses on development of drug delivery tools and new methods for analyzing cellular immune responses.

Participating Intramural Faculty

Daniel G. Anderson

Jianzhu Chen

Paula T. Hammond

Michael Hemann

Darrell J. Irvine

Tyler Jacks

Robert S. Langer

J. Christopher Love

K. Dane Wittrup

To browse recent publications by these and other Koch Institute faculty members, visit Progress, our monthly research review.