Richard O. Hynes

News + Videos

AACR Honors KI Faculty and Celebrates National Cancer Research Month

KI faculty member and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research Richard Hynes has been elected as a member of this year’s AACR Academy Class of Fellows. The AACR Academy was created in 2013 to recognize scientists worldwide whose contributions to cancer research have driven significant innovation and progress against cancer. Hynes joins fellow KI faculty members Tyler Jacks, Robert Horvitz, Phillip Sharp, and Robert Weinberg, who were inducted last year. Other members of the 2014 class include David Livingston, KI Scientific Advisory Board member and co-leader of the Bridge Project, former Board member Titia de Lange, Sharp Lab alumnus and Nobel Prize winner Andrew Fire, and several KI collaborators, including Hans Clevers, Lewis Cantley, Joan Brugge, and Stephen Elledge.

In other AACR award news, KI faculty member and Howard S. (1953) and Linda B. Stern Career Development Professor, Matthew Vander Heiden, has received the AACR Gertrude B. Elion Cancer Research Award, a one-year, $75,000 grant to support cancer research. Vander Heiden will use this award to continue his pioneering studies into the mechanisms of cancer cell metabolism, one of the breakout hot topics of this year’s AACR annual meeting.

In addition to recognizing innovative work within the scientific community, AACR is dedicated to raising public awareness about cancer research through such initiatives as National Cancer Research Month, celebrated in May every year. more...

Hynes Lab Identifies Extracellular Proteins that Help Tumors Metastasize

KI faculty member and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research Richard Hynes and a group of colleagues led by KI postdoc Alexandra Naba have discovered that certain proteins in the extracellular matrix, the supportive scaffold that gives tissues their structure, help cancer cells escape their original locations to spread through the body. The researchers identified dozens of proteins that surround highly metastatic breast cancer tumors, but not less aggressive tumors, and found that four of those proteins are critical to metastasis. The findings, which appear in the journal eLife, could lead to new tests that predict which tumors are most likely to metastasize, and may also help to identify new therapeutic targets for metastatic tumors. “In principle, one could imagine interfering with some of these extracellular proteins and blocking metastasis in a patient. We’re a long way from that, but it’s not inconceivable,” says Hynes. The researchers are now looking for extracellular matrix proteins that are overexpressed in metastatic colon and pancreatic cancers, and are also studying the role of extracellular matrix proteins in tissues to which tumors often metastasize. more...

David Benjamin Receives Competitive Research Grant

The Joanna M. Nicolay Melanoma Foundation presented KI graduate student David Benjamin, a member of the Hynes laboratory,with one of ten nationally competitive 2013 Research Scholar Awards.  The $10,000 grants support exceptional graduate student melanoma research and also provide distinction to lab directors, universities and cancer research institutions across the U.S. more...

Platelets Can Serve as a "Travel Kit" for Tumor Cell Migration

Platelets -- the blood cells that normally promote clotting -- are known to promote the metastatic spread of cancer, but the exact mechanism has remained unclear.  In the Nov. 14th issue of Cancer Cell, KI researchers report that platelets give off chemical signals that induce tumor cells to become more invasive and plant themselves in new locations. These findings may lead to new interventions to block metastasis. more...