Daniel G. Anderson

Daniel G. Anderson

Samuel A. Goldblith Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering and Institute for Medical Engineering and Science

Ph.D. 1997, University of California at Davis

 

KI Research Areas of Focus:
Nano-based Drugs
Cancer Immunology

"Our research is centered on developing new materials for medicine. We pioneered the use of robotic methods for the development of smart biomaterials for drug delivery and tissue engineering. Our lab has developed methods allowing rapid synthesis, formulation, analysis, and biological testing of large libraries of biomaterials for use in medical devices, cell therapy and drug delivery. One particularly important problem is the quest to develop nanoparticles that support the therapeutic delivery of drugs and macromolecules, inside of specific cell targets, in vivo. The advanced drug delivery systems we have developed provide new methods for nanoparticulate and microparticulate drug delivery, non-viral gene therapy, siRNA delivery, and vaccines."

Learn more about the work that Professor Anderson’s lab is doing to create tiny nanoparticles that can deliver RNA to a cancer cell to stop tumor growth by watching this video: "Inside the Lab: Daniel G. Anderson, Ph.D."

Dr. Daniel G. Anderson is the Goldblith Associate Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a member of the Department of Chemical Engineering, the Institute of Medical Engineering and Science, and the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research. He received his PhD in molecular genetics from the University of California at Davis. At MIT, he pioneered the use of robotic methods for the development of smart biomaterials for drug delivery and medical devices. His work has led to the first methods rapid synthesis, formulation, analysis, and biological evaluation of large libraries of biomaterials for use in medical devices, cell therapy and drug delivery. In particular, the advanced drug delivery systems he has developed provide new methods for nanoparticulate drug delivery, non-viral gene therapy, siRNA delivery, and vaccines. His work has resulted in the publication of over 230 papers, patents and patent applications. These patents have led to a number of licenses to pharmaceutical, chemical and biotechnology companies, and a number of products that have been commercialized or are in clinical development.

Further Information

Research Summary

Our research is centered on developing new materials for medicine. One particularly important problem is the quest to develop nanoparticles that support the therapeutic delivery of drugs and macromolecules, inside of specific cell targets, in vivo. There are many macromolecular drugs, such as DNA, RNA and some proteins, with great therapeutic potential that will only function when inside of a cell. Furthermore, many drugs are non-functional or even toxic if they do not get delivered to the correct cell-types in the body. The rational design of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems is often challenging, particularly when the design criteria are difficult to define. To address this challenge, we have developed fully automated, combinatorial systems for the synthesis, purification, characterization, and formulation of new biomaterials and nanoformulations. Materials identified using these approaches have shown great utility both in vitro and in vivo, including in non-human primate studies. We continue to focus our efforts towards developing next generation nanotherapeutics for cancer and other diseases, and to develop an understanding of the structure/function relationships between nanoparticle structure and biological activity.

In addition to nanotherapeutics, we are interested in developing advanced biomaterials for a range of applications including:

  • super biocompatible materials for islet transplantation,
  • glucose responsive drug delivery systems and sensors,
  • neural tissue engineering,
  • biomaterials for the growth, controlled differentiation, and therapeutic use of stem cells.

Selected Publications

Mei, Y., et al. (2010) Combinatorial Development of Biomaterials for Clonal Growth of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells, (Nature Materials, in press).

Love, K. T., et al. (2010) Lipid-Like Materials for Low Dose, in vivo Gene Silencing (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107 (5) pg 1864-1869).

Yang, F., et al. (2010) Genetic Engineering of Human Stem Cells for Enhanced Angiogenesis Using Biodegradable Polymeric Nanoparticles (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, in press).

Sunshine, J., et al (2009) Small molecule end group of linear polymer determines cell-type gene delivery efficacy (Advanced Materials, 21(48) pg 4947-).

Huang, Y H. (2009) et al. Nanoparticle-Delivered Suicide Gene Therapy Effectively Reduces Ovarian Tumor Burden in Mice (Cancer Research, 69 (15) pg 6184 - 6191).

Mei, Y., et al. (2009) Mapping the Interactions among Biomaterials, Adsorbed Proteins, and Human Embryonic Stem Cells. (Advanced Materials, 21 pg 2781-2786).

Whitehead, et al. (2009) Breaking Down Barriers: An Update on siRNA Delivery (2009). (Nature Reviews Drug Delivery, 8(2) 129-138) (Cover Feature)

Huang, Y., et al. (2009) Claudin-3 Gene Silencing with Small Interfering RNA Suppresses Ovarian Tumor Growth and Metastasis. (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106: 3426-3430).

Akinc, A, et al. (2008) A Combinatorial Library of Lipid-Like Materials for Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics. (Nature Biotechnology, 26(5) 561-569). (Cover Feature)

John, M., et al. (2007) Effective RNAi-Mediated Gene Silencing Without Interruption of the Endogenous miRNA Pathway (Nature, 449(7163): 745 -747)

Anderson, D. G., et al. (2004) Smart Biomaterials. (Science, 305(5692), 1923-1924).
Green, J. J., et al (2007) Combinatorial Modifications of Degradable Polymers Enable Transfection of Human Cells Comparable to Adenovirus (Advanced Materials, 19: 2836-2842) (Inside Cover Feature)

Anderson, D. G., et al. (2004) Rapid, Nanoliter-Scale Synthesis and Screening of Arrayed Biomaterials: Application to Human Embryonic Stem Cells. (Nature Biotechnology,22(7), 863-866).

Anderson, D. G., et al. (2003) Semi-automated synthesis and screening of a large library of degradable cationic polymers for gene delivery. (Angewandte Chemie, 42, 3153-3158).

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