Angelika Amon

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KI Member Angelika Amon Receives Genetics Society of America Medal

The KI congratulates faculty member Angelika Amon, the Kathleen and Curtis Marble Professor in Cancer Research, on receiving the 2014 Genetics Society of America Medal. The medal, established in 1981, honors elegant and highly meaningful contributions to modern genetics in the past 15 years. Amon is being recognized by the wider genetics community for her contributions to uncovering key principles of the cell cycle and cell division. more...

KI Collaborators Link Cell Growth and Shape Changes


Work by KI faculty members, engineer Scott Manalis and biologist Angelika Amon, appeared in the July 22 issue of Current Biology. The team demonstrated that extended periods of certain changes in cell morphology hamper protein synthesis, mass accumulation, and increase in cell size by inhibiting the TORC1 pathway. more...

KI Member Receives One of Europe’s Most Prestigious Medical Awards

KI member Angelika Amon, the Kathleen and Curtis Marble Professor of Cancer Research, has been awarded the 2013 Ernst Jung Prize for medicine, one of Europe’s most prestigious and generous medical awards. The Jung Foundation for Science and Research has honored Prof. Amon with this award for her pioneering work on the control of chromosomal segregation and the potential her research holds for the development of new cancer therapies. Amon shares this year’s prize with Ivan Đikić (Goethe University), who is being recognized for his contributions to understanding the role of ubiquitin in cellular signal regulation. Worth € 300,000, the Ernst Jung Prize for Medicine has been awarded annually since 1976 to support biomedical research that paves the way for the development of novel medical therapies. This year’s award ceremony will be held on May 3 in Hamburg, where the Jung Foundation is based. more...

Reverse Aging with Yeast Cells

Turning on a particular gene (a transcription factor, NTD80) in aged yeast cells, researchers in the Amon lab have doubled the cells’ usual lifespan. It could offer a new approach to rejuvenating human cells or creating pluripotent stem cells.“There’s a true rejuvenation going on, it took an old cell and made it young again,” says KI Professor Angelika Amon. more...

Targeting a Universal Cancer Weakness

A KI team has identified potential drugs that amplify the cellular stress caused by too many chromosomes, known as aneuploidy. When designing new cancer drugs, biologists often target specific gene mutations found only in cancer cells, or in a subset of cancer cells.  The team of biologists led by Angelica Amon from the Koch Institute is now taking a slightly different approach, targeting a trait shared by nearly all cancer cells. more...

Inside the Lab: Angelika Amon

Angelika Amon

Learn more about the Amon lab and how understanding cell division and cell stress may lead to the development of new drugs or compounds that selectively kill cancer cells.     watch...

Professor of Biology Angelika Amon

KI member elected to National Academy of Sciences

Angelika Amon is among 72 newly elected to the National Academy of Sciences, in recognition of distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. more...

Too much of a good thing: Cells with extra chromosomes share detrimental traits

Mammalian cells with extra chromosomes share some common traits that could be exploited to develop cancer treatments, according to MIT biologists. more...

Amon, Golub win cancer prize: Paul Marks Prize recognizes significant research contributions

MIT Professor Angelika Amon and Todd R. Golub of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard will share the 2007 Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research, an award of $150,000, with Gregory J. Hannon from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. more...