Sangeeta N. Bhatia

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Bridging the Gap in Ovarian Cancer: Targeting siRNA to Ovarian Cancer

Sangeeta Bhatia, M.D., Ph.D.
John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology & Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT Special Symposium: Bridging the Gap in Ovarian Cancer
September 16, 2014 watch...

Sangeeta Bhatia

Koch Institute Member Awarded $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize

Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia, biomedical engineer and faculty member at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, is the recipient of the 2014 $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize. Bhatia is recognized for designing and commercializing miniaturized technologies with applications to improve human health. The Lemelson-MIT Prize, celebrating its 20th year, honors outstanding mid-career inventors improving the world through technological invention and demonstrating a commitment to mentorship in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This is the second consecutive year, and third overall, in which a Koch Institute faculty member has been awarded the prize. Dr. Angela Belcher, W.M. Keck Professor of Energy, received the prize in 2013, and Dr. Robert S. Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor, received the prize in 1998. This also is only the fourth time an MIT faculty member has received the prize in its 20-year history. more...

New technique allows for better study of hepatitis B and drug treatments

When a hepatocyte—the main liver cell type—is isolated from the liver for study in the lab, it quickly becomes unstable. As a result, it is normally difficult to study how HBV-infected cells respond to antiviral drugs. Now, in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, members of Sangeeta Bhatia’s laboratory at MIT and Charles Rice’s laboratory at Rockefeller University describe how to effectively stabilize these liver cells and infect them robustly with HBV, which will allow researchers to study the immune response and investigate new treatments for the virus. HBV infects about 400 million people around the world and often leads to serious complications, including liver cancer. more...

Targeting siRNA Delivery to Tumors

Sangeeta Bhatia, MD, PhD 
John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology & Electrical Engineering
 and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Director, Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research 
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
watch...

Bhatia’s Paper-based Urine Test for Cancer, a Game Changer

MIT engineers led by KI faculty member Sangeeta Bhatia have developed a simple, cheap, paper-strip urine test that can reveal the presence of cancer within minutes. The paper-based diagnostic, described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, can be performed on unprocessed samples without specialized equipment and can be modified to detect different types or stages of disease. This point-of-care, image-free test is a big leap forward in bringing cancer detection to settings with little medical infrastructure. In countries where more advanced diagnostics are available, it could provide an inexpensive alternative to imaging.
 
The technology relies on nanoparticles that interact with tumor proteins called proteases, each of which releases hundreds of biomarkers detectable in a patient’s urine. In the original version of the technology, these biomarkers were detected using a highly specialized instrument called a mass spectrometer. Now, applying the same technology used in pregnancy tests, the researchers have adapted the particles so they can be analyzed on paper. The Bhatia Laboratory recently won a grant from MIT’s Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation to develop a business plan for a startup to commercialize the technology and perform clinical trials to bring this diagnostic to patients.
 
The research has been profiled in media outlets including The Boston Globe, The Huffington Post, Boston Magazine, The Times of India, and The Indian Express, and was funded by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, a Mazumdar-Shaw International Oncology Fellowship, the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Institutes of Health, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the National Cancer Institute, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. more...

Bhatia Develops Urine Test To Detect Blood Clots

KI faculty member Sangeeta Bhatia and her lab have created a simple urine test to detect blood clots, based on the same nanoparticle technology the lab first developed for early detection of cancers. The new diagnostic test is described in ACS Nano. For this application, the injectable nanoparticles' coating is sensitive to the presence of thrombin, a key blood-clotting factor. When the particles encounter thrombin, their surface coating releases peptides that are excreted and detectable in urine. Such a system could be used to monitor patients at high risk for blood clots or to rapidly triage patients in the emergency room. This research was funded by the Koch Institute Frontier Research Fund through the Kathy and Curt Marble Cancer Research Fund, the Mazumdar-Shaw International Oncology Fellows Program, the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, and MIT's Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation. Bhatia plans to launch a company to commercialize this technology with funding from the Deshpande Center. Other applications for the nanoparticle system include the tracking of liver, pulmonary, and kidney fibrosis. more...

Top Honors for Bhatia

The KI congratulates intramural faculty member Sangeeta Bhatia on being named among the top 10 most influential women in biotech by The Boston Globe. Bhatia, the John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology & Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT, oversees the Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies where, among other things, researchers develop sophisticated new nanoparticles for targeted cancer treatment. And if that weren't enough to keep them busy, they've also crowd-sourced the refinement of these targeting strategies through their online social-media-based game, NanoDoc. more...

Cancer Treatment Challenges Symposium/Roundtable

At this May 6, 2013 event, cancer biologists, engineers, and clinicians gathered at the Koch Institute at MIT for an open discussion of the greatest challenges and most promising solutions in cancer care. Speakers included:

Phillip A. Sharp, Institute Professor, Koch Institute at MIT
Sangeeta N. Bhatia, John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology & Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Koch Institute at MIT
K. Dane Wittrup, Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Koch Institute at MIT
Michael B. Yaffe, David H. Koch Professor of Biology and Biological Engineering, Koch Institute at MIT
Catherine J. Wu, Associate Physician, Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Jay S. Loeffler, Chief, Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital
Matthew R. Smith, Director, Genitourinary Malignancies Program, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center
Steven P. Balk, Staff Physician, Hematology/Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Hear highlights from the discussion in the video below. The event also featured presentations by researchers working on existing Bridge Project teams: Christopher Love, Koch Institute at MIT, Hidde Ploegh, Whitehead Institute and Koch Institute at MIT, and Kai W. Wucherpfennig, Dana Farber Cancer Institute
Novel Immunotherapies Against Pancreatic Cancer Elazer Edelman, Institute of Medical Engineering and Sciences at MIT and Koch Institute at MIT and Jeffrey W. Clark, Massachusetts General Hospital
A Pancreatobiliary Chemotherapy Eluting Stent for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas Rakesh K. Jain, Massachusetts General Hospital and Robert Langer, Koch Institute at MIT
Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) as a Novel Approach to Improve Drug Delivery in the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Keith L. Ligon, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and J. Christopher Love, Koch Institute at MIT
Single-Cell Functional, Genomic and Transcriptomic Analysis in Glioblastoma watch...

Bhatia Laboratory Nanoparticles Amplify Cancer Biomarkers to Enable Early Detection

The cleverly designed nanoparticles home to a tumor, interact with dysregulated cancer proteins, and act as synthetic biomarkers with levels easily detected in a patient’s urine.  The nanoparticles express several different peptides, which allows for the identification of specific types of tumors.  The biomarker amplification system could ultimately be used to monitor disease progression and tumor treatment response. more...

Adhesion Molecules Offer Potential Drug Targets

Researchers in the laboratory of KI member Sangeeta Bhatia identified two molecules, fibronectin and galectin-3, that can help cancer cells detach from tumors and spread throughout the body.  The team is now investigating the details of tumor cells’ interactions with the molecules, and working to develop new candidate therapeutics to inhibit those processes. more...

Technology Workshop: Sangeeta Bhatia

September 20, 2012 Early Detection/Diagnostics
Sangeeta Bhatia Koch Institute watch...

New Nanoparticles Shrink Ovarian Cancer Tumors in Mice

Vast amounts of genomic data can be quickly screened in mouse models to identify new therapeutic targets, using an RNA-delivering nanoparticle system developed in the laboratory of KI researcher Sangeeta Bhatia.  The system may help remove a bottleneck in cancer drug development.  In their first mouse study, a joint effort with members of the Broad and Dana Farber Cancer Institutes, Ki researchers showed that nanoparticles targeting the ID4 protein can shrink ovarian tumors in the mice.   Their findings appear in the Aug. 15 online edition of Science Translational Medicine. more...

3-D Printed Network May Help Grow Artificial Liver

BBC News reports that KI researchers, in collaboration with University of Pennsylvania scientists, have developed a synthetic blood vessel network structure that may one day be key in supporting liver and other organ transplants. The research was reported in the journal Nature Materials. more...

Liver-Like Cells Hold Promise for Studying Patient-Specific Responses

KI researchers, in collaboration with Rockefeller University and the Medical College of Wisconsin, have successfully modeled hepatitis C infection in the lab using cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This represents the first described iPSC model of infectious disease, and could enable study of patient-specific responses to disease and treatment. The findings were reported in the recent edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. more...

Making Tumors Vulnerable

 The Bhatia lab uses nanomaterials to make tumors more susceptible to treatment. watch...

Drug Screening Enhanced Through Tissue Engineering

Using tissue scaffolds, KI researchers have established a more efficient way of creating "humanized" mice livers that can also be rapidly implanted. The resulting engineered tissues hold promise for fast-tracking drug development. more...

Nanoparticles Zero in on Tumor

KI researchers have developed a “two wave” interactive nanoparticle drug delivery system.   The first wave of particles zeroes in on a tumor, then attracts the second wave of nanoparticles that carry and dispense a drug payload. This communication between nanoparticles, enabled by the body’s own biochemistry, boosted drug delivery to tumors by more than a factor of 40 in a mouse study. more...

Inside the Lab: Sangeeta Bhatia

Sangeeta Bhatia

Learn more about the work the Bhatia lab is doing to use micro and nanotechnologies to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy. watch...

KI team develops new tool for high-throughput DNA damage analysis

Our DNA is under constant siege from a variety of damaging agents. Damage to DNA and the ability of cells to repair that damage has broad health implications, from aging and heritable diseases to cancer. Unfortunately, the tools used to study DNA damage are quite limited, but MIT researchers have developed a new tool for rapid DNA damage analysis that promises to make an impact on human health. more...

Hepatitis virus

Hepatitis fight aided by liver cells advance

For the first time, a US team led by KI's Sangeeta Bhatia has managed to watch the progress of a rare strain of hepatitis C among liver cells kept alive in a lab dish. In the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they say it could lead to easier drug testing. more...

Researchers develop 'nano cocktail' to target and kill tumors

A team of researchers including a group at MIT has developed a "cocktail" of different nanometer-sized particles that work in concert within the bloodstream to locate, adhere to and kill cancerous tumors. more...

Three KI cancer researchers are selected by NIH for innovative grants

Professor Leona Samson is among 18 scientists nationwide to receive 2009 Pioneer Awards, the annual National Institutes of Health grants designed to encourage scientists to explore high-risk projects with the potential to dramatically transform health research. Linda Griffith, professor of biological and mechanical engineering, will receive one of 42 NIH Director's Transformative R01 (T-R01) Awards, another program to fund highly innovative research. KI researcher Sangeeta Bhatia is also a co-principal investigator on one of the T-R01 grants. more...

NOVA scienceNOW profiles KI's Sangeeta Bhatia

Intrigued by the idea of artificial organs, a biomedical engineer uses computer-chip technology to craft tiny livers. Scientist, MIT professor, and mom, Sangeeta Bhatia says she's just a "regular person." more...

KI's Sangeeta Bhatia and colleagues awarded Stand Up 2 Cancer (SU2C) funding

Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C), the Entertainment Industry Foundation's charitable initiative supporting groundbreaking research aimed at getting new cancer treatments to patients in an accelerated timeframe, has reached a significant milestone, awarding the first round of three-year grants - that total $73.6 million - to five multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional research "Dream Teams." more...

Gold Nanorods (Image: Sangeeta Bhatia Lab)

Gold "nanorod" formulations show promise in cancer detection and treatment

It has long been known that heat is an effective weapon against tumor cells. However, it's difficult to heat patients' tumors without damaging nearby tissues. Now, MIT researchers have developed tiny gold particles that can home in on tumors, and then, by absorbing energy from near-infrared light and emitting it as heat, destroy tumors with minimal side effects. more...

Forbes reports on the emerging role of artificial livers in developing new drugs

Maybe liver cells have the right to be such temperamental divas. They do a lot, such as building thousands of proteins, breaking down toxins, storing vitamins, metabolizing carbohydrates and helping digest fats. But take them out of the body, and they simply refuse to cooperate. At least so far. And so that's exactly what Sangeeta Bhatia, an MIT engineering professor who also has her M.D., wants them to do--function better outside of the body. If she can convince them to do that, a new vista of medical opportunities opens up, including better toxicity tests and even more replacement organs. more...

Bhatia Lab student wins Lemelson-MIT prize

MIT graduate student and biomedical engineer Geoffrey von Maltzahn is this year's winner of the $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for his promising innovations in the area of cancer therapy. The 28-year-old PhD candidate in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) was selected specifically for two of his inventions in nanomedicine: a new class of cancer therapeutics and a new paradigm for enhancing drug delivery to tumors. more...

KI faculty share latest technologies at recent World Economic Forum IdeasLab Annual Meeting

Sangeeta Bhatia and Michael Cima shared their latest research at an international meeting in Davos-Klosters, Switzerland. more...

KI professor among 10 "Women to Watch"

Sangeeta Bhatia, a professor of electrical engineering and health sciences and technology, was named one of the 10 "Women to Watch" on Jan. 23 by the newspaper Mass High Tech. Bhatia was cited with nine others for leading their respective fields and for outstanding dedication to technology, entrepreneurship, lifelong learning and civic responsibility. more...

Remote-control nanoparticles deliver drugs directly into tumors

MIT scientists have devised remotely controlled nanoparticles that, when pulsed with an electromagnetic field, release drugs to attack tumors. The innovation, reported in the Nov. 15 online issue of Advanced Materials, could lead to the improved diagnosis and targeted treatment of cancer. more...

Cultured liver cells (Photo: Bhatia Lab)

'Micro' livers could aid drug screening

MIT researchers have devised a novel way to create tiny colonies of living human liver cells that model the full-sized organ. The work could allow better screening of new drugs that are potentially harmful to the liver and reduce the costs associated with their development. more...